Public utility commissions (PUCs) oversee utility activities, including rates, programs, and plans, all of which have direct impacts on commercial and residential energy use in our cities. Below is a collection of IMT resources that can be used to learn more about PUCs and how we’re engaging with them to bring effective energy efficiency projects to local governments.

The Latest

Women in Energy Efficiency: Kelly Crandall

In this Q&A, Kelly, now Uplight’s Director of Risk and Compliance, shared how her current role is creating more sustainable energy opportunities for people and businesses around the world.

The PUC Perspective on a New Era for Local Governments and Public Utilities Commissions

Diversity in perspective is key to robust decision-making. Bringing together a robust set of stakeholders to workshop a problem can uncover new solutions that might have not been otherwise identified. This holds true in many areas, but especially in regulatory environments, where affordability, environmental concerns, resilience, public health and safety, and equity of access may … Continued

Local Government Engagement with Public Utility Commissions Mini Guide

Growing numbers of local governments, such as cities and counties, have identified benefits from working with public utility commissions (PUCs or commissions) to further their goals around clean energy, resilience, and affordability. For local government staff, elected officials, and the communities they serve, this document identifies the opportunities and benefits of working with commissions on … Continued

“It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit”: Creating Alignment between Cities and Utility Energy Efficiency Programs

Cities are increasingly acting as market catalysts to encourage and require building owners to improve energy performance. However, cities implementing building performance policies that require actions like audits or re-tuning may experience conflicts with their regulated utilities’ efficiency programs, which depend on energy savings being additional—not attributable to market adoption or preexisting laws. These utility … Continued